Massachusetts Fair Share

We stand up for a Massachusetts where everyone gets a fair shot, does and pays their fair share, and plays by the same rules.

85 Mass. economists join call to support early education

Today, April 24, Massachusetts Fair Share delivered a letter signed by 85 economists that pointed out the economic benefits early education can provide to Massachusetts, and called for greater investment from state leaders. The letter cites the long-term gains in student achievement, short terms gains in employment for young parents, and lower social service costs as reasons why, economically speaking, the state should devote more to early education.

“Much is said about the cost of universal early childhood education, but what we cannot afford is to fail to implement such a program,” said Arthur MacEwan, Professor Emeritus of Economics and Interim Director of the Center for Social Policy, University of Massachusetts Boston. “Every year we put it off, we suffer more long-term losses in economic growth and fail to improve the well-being of our children.”

As is noted by the 85 economists who have signed this letter, investment in early education would give a meaningful boost to our economy, reduce the achievement gap and help more children succeed. Frankly, there isn’t much reason not to expand our early education programs.”

Here is the letter, and the list of supporting economists:


April 24, 2015

Dear Massachusetts Lawmakers,

As you consider the FY16 budget, we, the undersigned economists, would ask you to increase available funding for early childhood education.

We support increasing investment in publicly-funded early education programs in the Bay State, and hope to see continued commitment toward that goal from your committee and the leadership of the Commonwealth.

There are many reasons to advance funding for high-quality early education, which has at least the same potential as other levels of education to be a powerful tool to reduce inequality and the opportunity gap. In addition, we would like to draw your attention to the ways that this funding will yield important returns by improving the Commonwealth’s economy:

  • High quality early childhood education elevates the quality of the workforce; children who have had this education experience an improvement in their cognitive, social and behavioral skills, which allow them to make greater contributions when they enter the workforce.
  • Publicly-funded high-quality early education programs allow more parents to join the workforce, confident that their children are well provided for while they are at work.
  • High-quality early education decreases the amount children will need in special services as they progress through school and in social service programs when they become adults.

In 2000, the Committee on the Science of Early Childhood Development of the National Research Council and Institute of Medicine noted: “From birth to age 5, children rapidly develop foundational capabilities on which subsequent development builds. In addition to their remarkable linguistic and cognitive gains, they exhibit dramatic progress in their emotional, social, regulatory, and moral capacities. All of these critical dimensions of early development are intertwined, and each requires focused attention.” All children deserve, and the whole society benefits from, giving children this attention through high quality early childhood education.

In the interests of fostering a more vibrant economy in the Commonwealth, as well as improving the lives of children and their families, we support action to invest in high-quality early childhood education.

Sincerely,

  • Arthur MacEwan, Professor Emeritus of Economics and Interim Director of the Center for Social Policy, University of Massachusetts Boston
  • Kehinde F. Ajayi, Assistant Professor of Economics, Boston University
  • Randy Albelda, Professor of Economics, University of Massachusetts Boston
  • Jack Amariglio, Professor of Economics, Merrimack College
  • Ken Ardon, Chair Economics Department, Salem State University
  • V. Lee Badgett, Center for Public Policy & Administration and Dept. of Economics, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Randall Bartlett, Professor of Economics, Smith College
  • Amit Basole, Assistant Professor Economics, University of Massachusetts Boston
  • Carole Biewener, Professor of Economics and Women’s and Gender Studies, Simmons College
  • Roger Bolton, Williams College
  • Samuel Bowles, Professor Emeritus of Economics, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • James Boyce, Professor of Economics, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Ralph Bradburd, Professor of Economics, Williams College
  • Michael Carter, Chair Economics Department, University of Massachusetts Lowell
  • Arthur Schiller Casimir, Ph.D., Professor of Economics, Western New England University
  • Phoebe Chan, Associate Professor of Economics, Wheaton College
  • Suzanne Chuku, Westfield State University
  • Bryan Engelhardt, Ph.D., Associate Professor, College of the Holy Cross
  • Gerald Epstein, Professor of Economics and Co-Director, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Bilge Erten, Assistant Professor of Economics, Northeastern University
  • Kade Finnoff, Assistant Professor of Economics, University of Massachusetts Boston
  • Professor Gerald Friedman, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Monica Galizzi, Ph.D., University of Massachusetts Lowell
  • Daniel Georgianna, Ph.D, Professor Emeritus of Economics, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
  • Claudia Goldin, Henry Lee Professor of Economics, Harvard University
  • John Haris, Professor of Economics, Boston University
  • Jonathan Haughton, Professor of Economics, Suffolk University
  • Adam Honig, Northeastern University
  • Keren Mertens Horn, University of Massachusetts Boston
  • Sarah Jacobson, Assistant Professor, Williams College
  • J K Kapler, University of Massachusetts Boston
  • Professor Roger T. Kaufman, Smith College
  • Sari Pekkala Kerr, Wellesley College
  • Marlene Kim, Professor of Economics, University of Massachusetts Boston
  • Yun K. Kim, University of Massachusetts Boston
  • Harry Konstantinidis, Assistant Professor of Economics, University of Massachusetts Boston
  • Laurence Kotlikoff, Professor of Economics Boston University and President Economic Security Planning, Inc.
  • David M. Kotz, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Kevin Lang, Department of Economics, Boston University
  • Anthony Laramie, Professor Merrimack College
  • William Lazonick, Professor of Economics, University of Massachusetts Lowell
  • Barton Lipman, Boston University
  • Jeffrey A. Livingston, Bentley University
  • Daniel M. Lomba, Jr. Ph.D., Bridgewater University
  • David Love, Williams College
  • Maria Luengo-Prado, Associate professor of Economics, Northeastern University
  • Catherine Lynde, Economics Department, University of Massachusetts Boston (Retired)
  • Michael Manove, Ph.D., Boston University
  • Stephen Marglin, Professor of Economics, Harvard University
  • Julie Matthaei, Professor of Economics, Wellesley College, Cofounder and Boardmember, U.S. Solidarity Economy Network
  • Marc Melitz, Professor of Political Economy, Harvard University
  • John Miller, Professor of Economics, Wheaton College
  • Peter J. Montiel, Williams College
  • Swati Mukerjee, Ph.D, Associate Professor of Economics, Bentley University
  • Professor Julie A Nelson, Chair Department of Economics, University of Massachusetts Boston
  • Harold Peterson, Associate Professor of Economics, Boston College
  • Karl Petrick, Associate Professor of Economics, Western New England University
  • Karen Pfeifer, Professor Emerita of Economics, Smith College
  • Greg Phelan, Assistant Professor Department of Economics, Williams College
  • Robert Pollin Distinguished Professor of Economics and Co-Director, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Mohan Rao, Professor of Economics, University of Massachusetts at Amherst
  • Smriti Rao, Associate Professor Economics and Global Studies, Assumption College
  • Tom Riddell, Lecturer and Professor Emeritus, Smith College
  • Robert A. Rosenthal, Ph.D., Professor, Economics Department, Stonehill College
  • Michael Samson, Director of Research Economic Policy Research Institute, Williams College
  • Alicia Sasser-Modestino, Associate Professor of Public Policy and Urban Affairs and Economics at Northeastern University
  • John Sheahan, Professor of Economics, Emeritus, Williams College
  • Katharine Sims, Amherst College
  • Peter Skott, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Professor Bryan Snyder, Department of Economics, Bentley University
  • Peter Spiegler, Assistant Professor of Economics, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Mary Huff Stevenson, Professor of Economics, Emeritus, University of Massachusetts Boston
  • Anand Swamy, Professor of Economics, Williams College
  • Vis Taraz, Assistant Professor of Economics, Smith College
  • David Turkla Dean, Professor of Economics, University of Massachusetts Boston
  • Vamsi Vakulabharanam, Associate Professor, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Madhavi Venkatesan, PhD, Bridgewater State University
  • Mwangi wa Gĩthĩnji, Associate Professor of Economics, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Rodrigo Wagner, Tufts University
  • Christian E. Weller, Professor of Public Policy, McCormack Graduate School of Policy and Global Studies, University of Massachusetts Boston, Senior Fellow, Center for American Progress
  • Jeannette Wicks-Lim, Assistant Research Professor, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Emily Wiemers, Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts Boston
  • Brenda Wyss, Associate Professor of Economics, Wheaton College
  • Andrew Zimbalist, Professor of Economics, Smith College
  • David Zimmerman, Williams College
Advertisements

One comment on “85 Mass. economists join call to support early education

  1. Pingback: Throwback Thursday: 85 Economists Call for Early Education |

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Information

This entry was posted on April 24, 2015 by in early education.
%d bloggers like this: